Blog

Shapeflow OSX Screenshot

Shapeflow Update

I haven’t written any updates on Shapeflow itself in a while. The problem with developing a framework instead of just an application is that one often has a long stretch where no real progress is visible in the user interface. But rest assured, I’m still working on it!

Read More

Featured Post
Tabbed NSDocument-based macOS Rendering

Advanced NSView Setup with OpenGL and Metal on macOS

I have been tweaking the UI code for the macOS variant of Shapeflow over the last couple of days. It’s surprisingly difficult to get rid of all the kinks and quirks. Two interesting aspects were how to get on-demand rendering working (e.g. only draw a new frame if something really has changed) and drawing only the active document tab.

Read More

Featured Post

Update of SVN/GIT policies

Over the last couple of months, I got some great feedback on my article about SVN/GIT policies. How to use a VCS “correctly” seems to be a hotly debated topic in pretty much every company and there are lots misconceptions out there. Since the article proofed to be a good point of reference for starting a more in depth discussion, I’ve updated and extended it with some new points:

  • a short discussion on why most developers use their VCS more like a backup tool than a tool for collaboration
  • comparing regularly reading the commit log to reading the news paper
  • added a section on work-in-progress branches as a symptom of “no feature branches” policies
  • comparing the reasoning behind GIT rebase vs GIT merge

If you’ve got thoughts/feedback, please feel encouraged to send it to me. I’m particularly interested in anecdotes as experimental proof of why certain policies result in specific outcomes.

Featured Post

Successful branching strategies and commit policies for SVN/GIT

I remember reading a CVS book back in 2002 or so. It had a quote saying “coding without a versioning system is like parachuting without a parachute”. I always liked this quote as it captured what an essential role version control plays in programming. The world has changed a lot since then. Now almost everyone uses a GIT or SVN as the integration into IDEs has gotten standard and sites like GitHub make it easier than ever. The problem with it is the fact that simply having a version control system (VCS) is only part of the solution: one also has to have the right mindset and policies in place to use it effectively because otherwise, one may very well have a parachute but keep fighting with it as one gets tangled in the ropes.

This is a guide that presents best practices on working with a version control system. It is primarily motivated by all the companies I have visited or worked at where the VCS had gone awry at some point and of course those where it worked like a charm. I assume that the reader is familiar with the basic concepts of a commit or branch and has actively worked with a VCS such as SVN or GIT.

Read More

Featured Post
Panorama

Creating 360 panoramas using PtGui and Affinity Photo

Well, here is something I wanted to do for a long time: create my own surroundings. And the first step for this is of course to create a 360/180 panorama image to use as an env-map. After some unsuccessful first attempts, I finally managed to get a decent result. So here are a couple of tips for anyone else trying to do this.

Read More

Featured Post
Switzerland reconstruction of postal code regions using Openstreetmap

Reconstruction of postal code areas using Openstreetmap

As a quick side project, I’ve started working on the problem that postal code area information in Openstreetmap is often insufficient. Why? Because it’s a nice show case of how flexible the Core SDK is, allows me to stress test the 2D / orthogonal handling code paths and it is a good opportunity to potentially contribute to this great, crowd sourced project.

Read More

Featured Post
Metashape Architecture Renderlayout

Explaining the Render Layout Sub-System in Core SDK

The render layout sub-system in Core SDK is one of its central features. It helps compose multiple views or multiple output displays to a single consistent layout and is one of the reason why the SDK is so versatile. But it also helps managing input mapping and other aspects such as stereoscopic VR/AR rendering. Here is how:

Read More

Featured Post
Shield model with diffuse, normal and specular map

Normal and Specular Map Support

After adding FBX support the other week, there was yet another reason to finally add support for normal and specular maps. While it’s still not physically-based-rendering but a simple Phong lighting model, it’s still a nice improvement to the overall image quality and helped developing some further multipurpose code.

Read More

Featured Post
FBX Import Test

Adding FBX Support

FBX has gotten quite a high adaption rate over the years. I had shied away from adding support for it because there is no official spec, only unofficial bits and pieces like the document the Blender foundation published a while ago. There is the official FBX SDK but it is in binary form only. However, it seemed to be the most viable option to be able to handle all the different versions the format had over the years.

Read More

Featured Post
Trac Logo

Setting up TRAC on macOS

For those who haven’t heard of it yet, TRAC is an open source combination of a ticket and a wiki system mixed with version control integration written in Python. It’s great for organising work especially in small to mid-size development teams but due to the large number of plug-ins and its incredible plug-in API, one can even customise it to cover other aspects of a business. I had meant to write a blog post about it for a while, mostly as a cheat sheet for myself or as a reference to point others to. Since I had to move my personal TRAC to a new machine it is the perfect occasion to write it down for once. So here goes …

Read More

Featured Post